Beautiful Places You Have To Visit When In Kota

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, stuff be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, thumb we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, stuff be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, thumb we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

C.S. Lewis once wrote to his granddaughter, online Lucy, “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” The pangs of growing up cannot be expressed in better words.

The trials and tribulations of adolescence force us to often abandon the child in us. And along with it the things we hold dear. There were times when playing in the rain would fill our hearts with delight. Now, it just numbs the agony of nostalgia. Once, books and comics were the windows to a differnt universe but now they are just mediums of opinion.

As a child of the 90’s our sweet dreams were made of Diamond Comics, Raj Comics and Twinkle Comics. But in the rush of life we let go of them believing that they were a child’s obssession. We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are comic books and graphic novels that are so philosophically riveting that they will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus and the grandest one at that.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the very first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami which disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a reclusive man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The gloominess of Jimmy’s life is only alleviated by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in gloominess.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you craving for more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, stuff be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, thumb we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

C.S. Lewis once wrote to his granddaughter, online Lucy, “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” The pangs of growing up cannot be expressed in better words.

The trials and tribulations of adolescence force us to often abandon the child in us. And along with it the things we hold dear. There were times when playing in the rain would fill our hearts with delight. Now, it just numbs the agony of nostalgia. Once, books and comics were the windows to a differnt universe but now they are just mediums of opinion.

As a child of the 90’s our sweet dreams were made of Diamond Comics, Raj Comics and Twinkle Comics. But in the rush of life we let go of them believing that they were a child’s obssession. We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are comic books and graphic novels that are so philosophically riveting that they will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus and the grandest one at that.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the very first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami which disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a reclusive man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The gloominess of Jimmy’s life is only alleviated by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in gloominess.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you craving for more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, dosage be it Diamond Comics, symptoms Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, viagra we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, stuff be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, thumb we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

C.S. Lewis once wrote to his granddaughter, online Lucy, “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” The pangs of growing up cannot be expressed in better words.

The trials and tribulations of adolescence force us to often abandon the child in us. And along with it the things we hold dear. There were times when playing in the rain would fill our hearts with delight. Now, it just numbs the agony of nostalgia. Once, books and comics were the windows to a differnt universe but now they are just mediums of opinion.

As a child of the 90’s our sweet dreams were made of Diamond Comics, Raj Comics and Twinkle Comics. But in the rush of life we let go of them believing that they were a child’s obssession. We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are comic books and graphic novels that are so philosophically riveting that they will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus and the grandest one at that.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the very first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami which disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a reclusive man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The gloominess of Jimmy’s life is only alleviated by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in gloominess.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you craving for more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, dosage be it Diamond Comics, symptoms Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, viagra we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, cure be it Diamond Comics, order Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, remedy we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, stuff be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, thumb we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

C.S. Lewis once wrote to his granddaughter, online Lucy, “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” The pangs of growing up cannot be expressed in better words.

The trials and tribulations of adolescence force us to often abandon the child in us. And along with it the things we hold dear. There were times when playing in the rain would fill our hearts with delight. Now, it just numbs the agony of nostalgia. Once, books and comics were the windows to a differnt universe but now they are just mediums of opinion.

As a child of the 90’s our sweet dreams were made of Diamond Comics, Raj Comics and Twinkle Comics. But in the rush of life we let go of them believing that they were a child’s obssession. We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are comic books and graphic novels that are so philosophically riveting that they will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus and the grandest one at that.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the very first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami which disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a reclusive man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The gloominess of Jimmy’s life is only alleviated by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in gloominess.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you craving for more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, dosage be it Diamond Comics, symptoms Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, viagra we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, cure be it Diamond Comics, order Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, remedy we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, treat be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Every year, prescription a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

Every year, sickness a plethora of epic action films flood the box office. But only a few of them are destined for greatness. These movies made you believe you could drop kick a rapscallion into oblivion :

Terminator 2: Judgment Day

Terminator

Robo-Schwarzenegger returns, this time to save John Connor, the future leader of the human resistance against machines. With a freaky sci-fi premise, amazing action, and visual effects that still hold up.

The Matrix

The-Matrix

The inspiration for countless camera tricks and slow-the-action-waaaaay-down shootouts, The Matrix managed to do what Speed and Point Break couldn’t—make Keanu Reeves seem human (albeit only compared to a horde of intelligent computer programs).

300

300

The hyper-visual retelling of King Leonidas and his army of 300 tighty-whited soldiers’ attempt to take down the mighty Persian ruler Xerxes and his 100,000 deep battalion. It’s like watching a demo of a Xbox 720 game. Plus, it’s The Wire‘s McNulty (Dominic West)!

Enter the Dragon

Enter the dragon

Purists can quibble and say that Bruce Lee was doper before he went big budget Hollywood, but Enter The Dragon had Jim Kelly, Bolo, and the Master taking on like 50 dudes in the penultimate scene. And no, Bruce Lee don’t need no stinkin’ “pause.”

Supercop

Super Cop

For purists, Supercop remains Chan’s all-around best movie, and it’s easy to see why: With high-flying, hilariously timed stunts (all performed by the man himself) and impeccable chemistry with fellow kick-and-punch champ Michelle Yeoh, director Stanley Tong’s balls-out romp never gets old.

Ong Bak: Muay Thai Warrior

Ong Bak

The most brutal martial arts movie EVER brought Muay Thai style to the mainstream, thanks to Tony Jaa’s death-defying stunts.

The Raid: Redemption

The Raid

Well, in the case of writer-director Gareth Evans’ ferocious and breathless The Raid: Redemption, it’s bare hands, feet concealed by boots, and automatic weapons. With the leanest of plots, The Raid incorporates the Indonesian fighting style known as Silat to a punishing degree, showing how SWAT team members and ruthless criminals try to out-Silat one another while trapped inside a beat-down apartment building. The result: Some of the best hand-to-hand choreography you’ll ever see.

Oldboy

Oldboy

The Korean filmmaker’s third revenge saga has so many mindfuck moments that to call it “intense” is an understatement—and that’s not even counting the illest plot twist possibly in film history.

Casino Royale

Casino Royale

James Bond (Daniel Craig) faces off against businessmen with terrorist ties in this gritty franchise reboot. After 20 cheeky movies, the 007 series finally gets real—apparently, killing for a living and heartlessly (digging and) dogging out women makes a man kind of a dick. Who knew?

The Bourne Ultimatum

Bourne

The last of a trilogy that improved with each sequel, Ultimatum‘s relentless cat-and-mouse chase turns a train-station stroll into a pulse-quickening pursuit, a coffee-table book into a brutal weapon, and Matt Damon into the ultimate ass-kicking machine. That was a lot of hyphens, but you get the drift.

Bloodsport

Bloodsport

An American (Jean-Claude Van Damme, oddly enough) goes AWOL and heads to Hong Kong to compete in one of those super-secret underground martial-arts tournaments. And in a surprise ending, he kicks everyone’s ass. Sorry, did we ruin it for you?

First Blood

First Blood

The sequel (Rambo) got more hype, but the original is less of a caricatured bloodbath and more of a nuanced look inside the mind of a mentally scarred Vietnam vet who refuses to bow down to authority. Stallone at his unfuckwittable best.

Predator

Predator

OK, let’s get this straight. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jesse Ventura (that’s two governors right there), and Apollo fucking Creed (Carl Weathers) get stalked by a dreadlocked alien who’s armed with a nuclear device? Two words: Fuck and yes.

We all have grown up reading comic books, discount be it Diamond Comics, more about Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, find we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, stuff be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, thumb we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that it will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably the magnum opus of Frank Miller.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

C.S. Lewis once wrote to his granddaughter, online Lucy, “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” The pangs of growing up cannot be expressed in better words.

The trials and tribulations of adolescence force us to often abandon the child in us. And along with it the things we hold dear. There were times when playing in the rain would fill our hearts with delight. Now, it just numbs the agony of nostalgia. Once, books and comics were the windows to a differnt universe but now they are just mediums of opinion.

As a child of the 90’s our sweet dreams were made of Diamond Comics, Raj Comics and Twinkle Comics. But in the rush of life we let go of them believing that they were a child’s obssession. We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are comic books and graphic novels that are so philosophically riveting that they will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus and the grandest one at that.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the very first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami which disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a reclusive man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The gloominess of Jimmy’s life is only alleviated by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in gloominess.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you craving for more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, dosage be it Diamond Comics, symptoms Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, viagra we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The stroy is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, cure be it Diamond Comics, order Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, remedy we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivializes the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several generas — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series is breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

We all have grown up reading comic books, treat be it Diamond Comics, viagra dosage Raj Comics or Twinkle Comics. And it is a part of our childhood. But somewhere between learning to tie our laces to knoting our ties, we out grew comic books, it is a child’s obssession after all.

We couldn’t be furthur away from the truth. There are graphic novels that are so mature and philosophically riveting that ithey will have you respecting the artform of comics. Here are such great graphic novels :

The Dark Knight Returns

Dark Knight

Frank Miller created what many comic book enthusiasts claim to be the Holy Grail of graphic novels. The book tells a story of an aging Bruce Wayne, who has hung up his cape after the death of Robin.  As the story rolls on, Batman is forced out of retirement resulting into old foes coming out to play again. It is undeniably Frank Miller’s magnum opus.

Watchmen

Watchmen

The greatest graphic novel, period. It’s noir vibe and gritty story will have you hooked from the first page. The comic was so impactful that it caused a tsunami that disrupted the conventional trend of storytelling.

Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth

Jimmy Corrigan

Chris Ware tells the story of a solitary, withdrawn man in his thirties who meets his father for the first time. The bleakness of Jimmy’s life is only relieved by his fantasies about his adventures as the Smartest Kid on Earth, which unfortunately also tend to end in … bleakness. Every page is a master class in minimalist graphic design, that slices time into discrete, intensely felt moments in a way that no other medium can.

Sandman

Sandman

The story is about Morpheus the Lord of Dreams who has been magically captured by an occult group. He somehow escapes, but his kingdom, the Dreaming, a kind of geographical expression of our collective unconsciousness, has fallen into disrepair, and he must restore it to its former glory. It is a beautiful mix of mythology and horror that will have you wanting more.

Maus

Maus

Maus won a Pulitzer in 1992. That itself is a landmark event in the history of graphic novels. The comic deals with the German Holocaust, except that the humans are replaced with mice. Don’t let that fool you though, in no way does the comic trivialise the unspeakable event. The message is as potent as it can be.

The Adventures of Tintin: The Black Island

Tintin

Tintin is a crazy mix of several genres — you never quite know what you’re in for when you open one of those books. Hergé’s art is an inimitable mix of caricaturish and photographic hyper-realism that will have you marvelling the pages. All the volumes of the series are breathtaking, but ‘The Black Island’ is definitely the best of the lot.

Go ahead and let your mind be blown away, for these novels will definitely rekindle the spark of reading.

 

Kota is renowned for its art and architecture. So if you happen to be in Kota, page and interested in mansions, look forts, monuments and museums, you are in luck. Doesn’t matter whether you are visiting the city or staying in a hostel or a PG, take some time out and explore the city. Its charm will have you falling in love. Here are a few places you could visit :

Jag Mandir –  Kansua Temple, Godavari Dham Temple and Jag Mandir are a few old religious places in Kota that are to be seen in order to grasp their beauty. These ancient temples are filled with intricate carvings and their architecture will have you mesmerised.

Jawahar Sagar Dam If you want to be bowled over, Jawahar Sagar Dam is a must visit site. Along with that you could stop at Chhattar Bilas Garden, Kishore Sagar, Raniji Ki Baoli, Haveli of Devtaji, Adhar Shila and Budh Singh Bafna haveli.

kota bairage

Gaipernath Waterfall – Along with man made structures, one must also indulge in the natural beauty of the Gaipernath Waterfall and the Darrah Wildlife Sanctuary as these are worthy sites.

Waterfalls

Kishore Sagar – Kishore Sagar is an artificial picturesque lake constructed by the Bundi Prince Dehra Deh. It is located by the side of the attractive Brij Vilas palace museum.

Mandir

Seven Wonders Park – Now a premier attraction of Kota, this park has replicas of the Seven Wonders of The World including Taj Mahal, Pyramids of Egypt, Eiffel Tower, Brazil’s Christ the Redeemer, Statue of Liberty and Rome’s Colosseum.

Seven

Chambal Gardens – Chambal Garden, a beautiful garden in the backdrop of Chambal river, is a much sought picnic spot in Kota. The garden located at Amar Niwas on the landscape of Chambal river encloses a well maintained pond, a habitat for crocodiles.

Gardens

Garadia Mahadev – A popular Shiva Temple, Garadia Mahadev is located slightly away from the main town and attracts lots of locals as a tourist attraction.

GARADIA-MAHADEV-TEMPLE

City Palace – An amalgamation of Mughal and Rajasthani architecture and art, the City Palace is a reminder of the glorious royal past of the city. With its splendid blend of style, the City Palace Fort is an amazing construction.

City palace

So if you are visiting the city with your family or your parents plan to visit the city while you are there, do visit these places with them to make some fond memories.

Published by : Zolostays

Bibhu Sarkar

I love orange soda.